Exotic Flowers - We Deliver Flowers in Boston

The Symbolic Meaning of the Hyacinth

Posted by Suzie Canale on Mon, Jan 09, 2017

"Innocent Hyacinth Tinted with Mint"

Innocent Hyacinth tinted with mint

Tingèd grey hinged on stem singed

With chestnut leaves flowing, to me a fair hint


Of off-centered carousing, black eyes perusing

Wares of all sorts and stocks of all shares

The leading on of a pleasure most gracefully enthusing…


By Guy Braddock

Mar 24, 2014


The hyacinth is probably the most famous blossom associated with the end of winter in New England and the beginning of a new spring season.  Although it is customarily tied to native Boston gardening, the hyacinth actually originated in western Asia and was eventually brought to Europe where their popularity expanded across the continents.  The bulbs are typically planted in the fall and are the first to arrive as soon as the temperatures begin to raise up into the low forty to fifty degree weather patterns.  They are quite popular in flower shops and nurseries because they are available in a wide array of colors including purple, pink, peach, white and even salmon.  The hyacinth is world renowned by the largest importers of the world and has maintained one of the top five spots for most exported flower for gifts within holidays such as Easter, Valentine’s and Mother’s Day.  One of the reasons is due to their incredible scent that usually registers as a sweet infused aroma.  Its ability to outlast many of its other floral companions is another reason it keeps itself in high demand.  Many believe its sturdy shape and compacted bell-like heads acquires the asset of longevity for the plant.   The petals climb up a durable stem and form a tree-like formation with several flowers blossoming one on top of the other.  

hyacinth.jpg

Symbolically, the hyacinth is dated back to the Greeks, where both the gods, Apollo and Zephyrus pined after the goddess, “Hyacinth”.  When Zephyrus became jealous of his fierce competition from the handsome boy, he changed the course of the wind, causing a discus to hit Apollo and kill him.  Broken hearted, the goddess decided that flowering hyacinth would forever bloom wherever her lover’s blood had shed as a sign for remembrance.  This is why themes such as sorrow were originally tied to the bloom although constancy and discretion are also mentioned in reference to hyacinth.  


Through the years and cultivation of the species, the eclectic assortments of colors that are now grown have brought about a new way of categorizing the hyacinth’s meaning.  Refer to the chart below to see a chart of each color and what it means.


            Pink-Bashfulness/Happiness        Yellow- Jealousy          Purple-Sadness

            Blue- Sincerity     White-Purity

Tags: Flowers as Symbols, Language of Flowers, Hyacinth, Flower Meanings

After the Snowpocalypse - What Will Bloom First in Boston

Posted by Suzie Canale on Wed, Mar 25, 2015

So there’s still a lot of snow on the ground but things are starting to heat up around here in Boston!  Pretty soon, the gutters will stop leaking, the ice on the driveway will melt and our shovels will be put away until next winter but guess what else will be changing soon?  Our gardens!  Yes, my fellow New Englanders, I promise you there’s actually life in the works happening right below those last few feet of blanketed snow.  You may be looking out your window in disbelief, but it’s a fact that a snowy winter can actually be beneficial to our flower and vegetable beds.   This is because the snow acts as a warm cover and becomes its own watering system long after the fruit and blossoms have reaped their seasonal harvest.  Herb gardens can do particularly well within this case, benefiting varieties such as rosemary, sage and thyme.  New plantings of basil and some types of parsley can be expected, but all in all your herbs will thank old man winter for his snow fury.  So what should we expect to see bloom first in our backyards after the clean up has occurred?  Here are some beauties to look forward to until spring officially arrives…

 crocus in boston

Crocuses

Crocuses are probably the number one flower that appears first in most New England gardens.  Originating from the iris family, crocuses bloom from what are called “Corms”.  The ability for the heads to extend through colder weather and even snow make this a desirable plant for garden lovers as well as their beautiful colors that include purple, violet, yellow, white and even striped.  Another bonus of including crocus in your plantings is that they are very hard to kill and will spread and multiply over time. 

 

Tulips

If you haven’t planted tulips in your yards quite yet, here are a few reasons to get you motivated.   Grown from a bulb, Boston soil is ideal for cultivation because they love cold winters and dry summers, which holds common to this area.  Native to southern Russia, these beauties are ultimately bred in almost every color imaginable including black, blue and multi-colored.  A tulip head can have one or double petals surrounding its center often resembling a stunning silk cocoon.  The perennials are perfect as edging for garden borders or placed in clumps to present a beautiful floral display. One thing to be mindful of if you live near a wooded forest area, deer absolutely love to eat this perennial and will chew the heads clean off if not guarded by a gate. 

 planting bulbs in boston

Hyacinth

Hyacinth is another spring season starter, arriving soon after the crocus and right before the tulips.  The plant is tied to Greek mythology believed to hold the blood of one of Apollo’s victims killed in battle. The shape of the hyacinth resembles a skinny beehive with several bell-like buds that run up and down the thick stem.  Available in shades of pink, white, lavender, yellow and dark blue, the flashy bulbed plants possess a sweet smell that will fragrant your home or garden.  Cuttings are remarkably durable so don’t forget to utilize hyacinth in spring bouquets and centerpieces! 

 Suzie Canale

Westwood MA

she had hundreds of bulbs to her home in Westwood every year.

Tags: Gardening, Gardening in Boston, Tulips, Hyacinth, bulbs

Snow Inspired Flower Arrangements

Posted by Suzie Canale on Wed, Feb 18, 2015

The snow blitz of 2015 hit New England hard, covering our cars, houses and well, everything in site up to eighty-eight inches of snow in the Boston area.  We survived Juno but if you’re like me, you might need a little pick me up to help shoo away the winter blues.  One way to accomplish this is to fill our living space with as much inspired growth as possible, namely flowers.  I know I use flowers as a natural remedy for most woes but there is no denying the power of beauty and fragrance to boost our lowered moods and dispositions.  Although we are experiencing the bitterness of the cold, there’s a sort of beauty that emanates from the sparkles of white enwrapped around everything we see.  Tiny crystals of light reflected in the sunlight and the impression of blanketed softness expels itself from the perfectly mounded bands of puffed snow.  For me, it’s a tough time of year too (I’m really a summer girl at heart) but even I can’t deny the sheer magnificence of newly fallen flakes.  The way I see it, if I can see impressive color, texture and design outdoors, why can’t I copy that same feeling within designing winter inspired arrangements for my own home?  After a few trial and errors, this was what I found to be the most successful combinations for this theme.

 white_hydrangea

White hydrangea is the perfect variety for this type of floral display because it carries all of the appropriate characteristics to what we see happening outside.  Besides toned in pure shades of white, the soft-pedaled head also comes close in proximately to the way snow impacts itself on the ground.  By tucking in a few stems within a bubble bowl, we really don’t need to add too much more than perhaps a sprig or two of lady’s mantle or octoberweed.  Not only will you love the presentation of simplicity but you’ll also be pleasantly surprised as to how long this piece will last.  Let’s just hope the same doesn’t hold true for all of that white stuff outside our windows!

 bulbs

There’s a new trend rearing its head around Boston flower shops and I’ve actually tried this on my own so I assure you-I’m just as impressed with it as they are.  Bulbs are making a screaming comeback but are being grown and displayed in new ways.  For instance, white daffodils or paper whites can be used indoors by placing them on the tops of narrowed bud vases.  Fill the container with water high enough to reach the bottom of the bulb and watch the roots start to grow before your eyes.  Place in a well-lit area and pretty soon a shoot will begin to extend upwards.  I love using this as a bedside arrangement and adore how inexpensive yet fabulous this method is.  Before you go out and buy bulbs, check your cellars for previously unused packages of grape hyacinth, tulips or any other springtime favorite. Situating the vessel near a warm heater also helps to surge a speedy flower creation.

Suzie Canale, Westwood, MA

Suzie created the above arrangement of bulbs and hyacinth.

Tags: Paper White Bulbs, Floral Design, Hydrangeas, winter, Hyacinth

Subscribe via E-mail

Contact Us for All Your Floral Needs